Baseball is the stuff of legend.

“The fundamental truth: a baseball game is nothing but a great slow contraption for getting you to pay attention to the cadence of a summer day.”
― Michael ChabonSummerland

I’m not much for sports in general, but I do enjoy baseball. Baseball seems kind of magical to me. My perception probably comes mostly from the afore-quoted novel, Summerland. In the book, it’s a magical sport that means everything, but is still the stuff of joy; it never takes on so much meaning that it ceases to be plain fun.

Janna, Sicily, Sarah and I had front seats to a professional game today, Rockies vs. Athletics. Here’s a picture or two:

I won’t pretend to know much about the sport, but there’s one thing I do love: the musical traditions. Sports people and music people sometimes don’t understand each other (I do know a few people who are both), but the worlds collide in unexpected and interesting ways. Even at football games, chanting in rhythm is part of the culture. But at baseball games, Americans stand up and sing at the seventh inning stretch. “Take me out to the ball game….”

Even more interesting is the tradition of the baseball organist. In 1941 the Chicago Cubs brought an organ onto the field as a one-day-only gimmick, but it caught on so well that they kept it. As of 2005, half of major league ballparks used live organists rather than pre-recorded organ music. Even with the modern addition of  ‘canned’ music at baseball games, organ remains strongly associated with baseball. The worlds of music and sports are actually inseparable after all.

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